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The decision (with apologies to Lebron James)

June 28, 2012 5:55 PM


Michael E. Rosman
General Counsel, The Center for Individual Rights

Today's decision demonstrates how both difficult and fascinating enumerated powers cases can be. Much can be said, but I would like to address one brief issue. Was there a holding today that the Individual Mandate was not a proper exercise of Congress's Commerce Clause and Necessary and Proper ("N&P") Clause powers?

The Chief claimed that there was, and he did so in Part III-C, which was designated as part of the Opinion of the Court (joined by Ginsburg, et al). Roberts Op. at 41-42 ("The Court today holds that our Constitution protects us from federal regulation under the Commerce Clause so long as we abstain from the regulated activity.") (emphasis added). Really? It is true that five Justices concluded that the Individual Mandate could not be justified under that constitutional power (and the N&P Clause), but four of them (Scalia, Alito, Kennedy, and Thomas) were in dissent (at least as to the constitutionality of the Individual Mandate issue). In United States v. Morrison, the Court specifically rejected the proposition that the conclusion of six Justices in United States v. Guest -- three in a concurrence and three in dissent - that Congress could reach private conduct under Section 5 of the Fourteenth Amendment, was a binding holding of the Court. U.S. v. Morrison, 529 U.S. 598, 624 (2000) ("This is simply not the way that reasoned constitutional adjudication proceeds.").

Today, Justice Ginsburg chided the Chief for even reaching the Commerce Clause question, which she thought was unnecessary given his opinion on the Tax Power. (She was right, of course, but the same thing could have been said about her own opinion.) Did she, and those joining her opinion, nonetheless think that the Court had held that the Individual Mandate was unconstitutional under the Commerce and N&P Clauses, as Part III-C of the Chief's opinion (for the Court, remember, joined by Ginsburg, et al.) says? Isn't unnecessary legal analysis what we call dicta? Curious, then, that the Reporter of Decision, in the summary of the decision, does not identify Part III-A of the Chief's opinion (in which he discusses the Commerce and N&P Clauses) as part of the opinion for the Court. Nor does the heading above the Chief's opinion (parts of which say "Opinion of the Court" and other parts of which say "Opinion of Roberts, C.J.").

So, was there a Commerce Clause holding? Maybe, but I doubt any subsequent Court that wants to ignore it will have difficulty doing so.

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FEATURED DISCUSSION ARCHIVE:


Obamacare Decision: Reactions, July 2012
Law School Faculty Diversity, May-June 2012
Class Actions, May 2012
Constitutionality of Individual Mandate, March 2012
Human Rights and International Law, February-March 2012
The constitutionality of President Obama's recess appointments, January 2012
Do caps on medical malpractice damages hurt consumers?, December 2011
Trial Lawyers Inc.: State Attorneys General, October 2011
Wal-Mart v. Dukes, April 2011
Kagan Supreme Court nomination, May-June 2010
Election roundtable, November-December 2006
Who's the boss, September 2006
Medical judgement, July 2006
Lawyer Licensing, May 2006
Contingent claims, April 2006
Smoking guns, July 2004

Isaac Gorodetski
Project Manager,
Center for Legal Policy at the
Manhattan Institute
igorodetski@manhattan-institute.org

Katherine Lazarski
Press Officer,
Manhattan Institute
klazarski@manhattan-institute.org

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