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‹ FEATURED DISCUSSION

November 02, 2006

Rep. Baker (R-La.) on the election

By Ted Frank

"I just never thought Id live to see the day when liberals would, as they have with relation to the markets, so openly advocate more taxation, more regulation, and more litigation, and, with a straight face, argue that most Americans would find this to be an attractive prescription for their financial well-being." Also:

Frivolous lawsuits are undeniably and unnecessarily raising the costs of doing business in America, and frightening off investors. I am convinced that common-sense securities-litigation class-action reform is not only a necessary component for safeguarding our global competitiveness, but that it also will cut the costs for plaintiffs in legitimate suits without diminishing the quality of representation. And while it is encouraging to see New Yorks Democratic Sen. Chuck Schumer write in the Wall Street Journal this week that it may be time to revisit the best way to reduce frivolous lawsuits without eliminating meritorious ones, I would be more confident in the prospect of bipartisan collaboration on this effort were it not for the hundreds of millions of dollars in campaign contributions the Democrats reap from these firms Milberg Weiss among them.

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Published by the Manhattan Institute

The Manhattan Insitute's Center for Legal Policy.