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Dodd-Frank at Four



Dodd-Frank turns four today. Proponents marketed the law as the response to the financial crisis of 2007 to 2009, even though it included many unrelated items and left out many matters central to the crisis. It is not surprising that four years later, Dodd-Frank is still flawed. A recent poll conducted on behalf of Better Markets found that sixty percent of the respondents support "stricter federal regulation on the way banks and other financial institutions conduct their business." Only ten percent of survey respondents think the federal government is doing a good job regulating the financial industry using the powers it has already, so additional authority for the government is not the answer. A more effective approach would be to allow the markets to do what they do best--allocate resources to their most productive use and punish firms that are not delivering products and services that people want and need at prices they are willing to pay. Government regulations often impede these healthy market functions. An intense government regulatory regime, such as the one embodied in Dodd-Frank, comes with deep government relationships with large financial institutions and implicit or explicit guarantees that the government will be there to clean up those firms' meeses. Taxpayers bear the cost of this regulatory regime, but so do the consumers and Main Street companies that financial markets are supposed to serve.

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Isaac Gorodetski
Project Manager,
Center for Legal Policy at the
Manhattan Institute
igorodetski@manhattan-institute.org

Katherine Lazarski
Press Officer,
Manhattan Institute
klazarski@manhattan-institute.org

 

Published by the Manhattan Institute

The Manhattan Insitute's Center for Legal Policy.