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FACTA shakedown files: Albright v. Bi-State Dev. Agency

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FACTA—which calls for statutory damages for printing too much information on credit card receipts—is perhaps the statute with the most abusive class action settlements, because notice rarely reaches class members and thus no one objects when the attorneys rip off the class. If a district court doesn't engage in its duty to protect class members, attorneys can walk away with windfalls while accomplishing next to nothing for their putative clients.

In Albright v. Bi-State Dev. Agency, a St. Louis federal case, here's how the settlement shook out:

$742.50 in cash and face value of tickets (surely mostly all tickets) to class members
$2,500 each to two class reps
$190,000 in attorneys' fees and expenses.

And the attorneys—Armstrong Law Firm, Bock Law Firm, LLC, and Chant and Co.—had the temerity to request over $400,000 in fees before the judge reduced it to something more than 200 times the class benefit. The class representatives got nearly seven times what the class got.

The case is Albright v. Bi-State Dev. Agency, 2013 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 129579 (E.D. Mo. Sept. 11, 2013).

1 Comment

How can the public be expected to trust the integrity of our courts when lawyers refuse to report judges who violate the judicial canons?

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Isaac Gorodetski
Project Manager,
Center for Legal Policy at the
Manhattan Institute
igorodetski@manhattan-institute.org

Katherine Lazarski
Press Officer,
Manhattan Institute
klazarski@manhattan-institute.org

 

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