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Around the web, October 21



  • Fifth Circuit: can't blame dredging companies for Hurricane Katrina damage. [Wajert; In Re: In the Matter of the Complaint of Great Lakes Dredge & Dock Co. LLC]
  • Ohio Court of Appeals: no class action against Best Buy for complying with state law in stove installation. The case was particularly egregious given that the "defrauded" lead plaintiff, who spent an extra $68 to come into compliance with state law, got a $75 gift certificate from Best Buy for his trouble. [Jackson]
  • Robbins Geller (which used to be Coughlin Stoia which used to be Lerach Coughlin) hires lobbyists to promote securities litigation in Dodd-Frank regulations. [BLT]
  • In West Virginia, feds not being fooled by Darrell McGraw creating slush funds with settlements when he was supposed to be reimbursing Medicare. [LNL]
  • Is the bisphenol A crisis "fiction"? [Goldberg @ Examiner]
  • Defense win for Novartis in New Jersey Aredia/Zometa jaw osteonecrosis case, even though plaintiff was a showcase plaintiff. [Drug and Device Law]
  • Democratic think tank Third Way opposes foreclosure moratorium. [via Zywicki @ Volokh]
  • NYCLU Title IX lawsuit squashes high-school soccer in NYC. [OL]

  • A review of the classic In re Hydrogen Peroxide class action certification decision. [Trask]
  • Indictment of Georgia federal judge on drug charges giving rise to challenges to his decisions, including by a vegan group that didn't get attorneys fees after the won only four dollars in a lawsuit. [AJC; WSJ Law Blog]
  • MI's Kay Hymowitz quoted on academia's rediscovery of the importance of culture in evaluating poverty. [NYT]

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Isaac Gorodetski
Project Manager,
Center for Legal Policy at the
Manhattan Institute
igorodetski@manhattan-institute.org

Katherine Lazarski
Press Officer,
Manhattan Institute
klazarski@manhattan-institute.org

 

Published by the Manhattan Institute

The Manhattan Insitute's Center for Legal Policy.