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Garrison Keillor reads a poem on product liability



Really!

During the "Morning Edition" news block, the local NPR station here in Washington, WAMU, runs the feature, "The Writer's Almanac," a short segment of Garrison Keillor mentioning historical moments of the day. (For example, today is Margaret Thatcher's 84th birthday, and she once said, "Being powerful is like being a lady. If you have to tell people you are, you aren't.") Then Keillor reads a poem. It's a nice little feature with almost none of the superciliousness you sometimes get from Keillor.

And the poem this morning was a delight, "Warnings" by David Allen Sullivan, who observes, "I collect warnings the way I used to collect philosophy quotes." An excerpt:

What would I have done without: Remove infant
before folding for storage
, Do not use hair dryer
while sleeping
, Eating pet rocks may lead to broken
teeth
, Do not use deodorant intimately?

Goodbye to all those sentences that sought
to puncture the illusory world-like the warning
on the polyester Halloween outfit for my son:
Batman costume will not enable you to fly.

From Sullivan's Strong-Armed Angels.

Walter has also written about excessive warning labels, but he prefers prose. See this Overlawyered post.

 

 


Rafael Mangual
Project Manager,
Legal Policy
rmangual@manhattan-institute.org

Katherine Lazarski
Manhattan Institute
klazarski@manhattan-institute.org

 

Published by the Manhattan Institute

The Manhattan Insitute's Center for Legal Policy.