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Kiobel debate complete



On Tuesday February 28, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments in Kiobel v. Royal Dutch Petroleum, a case testing the extent to which U.S. law enables litigation in American courts against multinational corporations for allegedly facilitating human-rights abuses in foreign nations in violation of international law norms.

In Kiobel, Nigerian nationals are attempting to invoke the Alien Tort Statute to sue oil companies that the plaintiffs allege worked with the Nigerian military to suppress local opposition to oil exploration. A divided panel of the Second Circuit rejected the Kiobel claim by reasoning that corporate liability was not customary international law, such that the claim lay outside the Alien Tort Statute's jurisdiction.

To discuss these issues, we were lucky to have two distinguished international law professors who each signed amicus briefs in the case, on either side. Julian Ku of Hofstra Law School signed a brief for professors of international law, foreign relations law and federal jurisdiction (PDF) that argued both that the original meaning of the Alien Tort Statute was far narrower than its current application and that the Kiobel suit was unwarranted based on Supreme Court precedent. David Weissbrodt, the Regents Professor and Fredrikson & Byron Professor of Law at the University of Minnesota Law School, signed a brief for international law scholars (PDF) that argued, conversely, that the suit was a legitimate application of international law through the Alien Tort Statute, and that the Second Circuit had misconstrued the international law in this case.


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Isaac Gorodetski
Project Manager,
Center for Legal Policy at the
Manhattan Institute
igorodetski@manhattan-institute.org

Katherine Lazarski
Press Officer,
Manhattan Institute
klazarski@manhattan-institute.org

 

Published by the Manhattan Institute

The Manhattan Insitute's Center for Legal Policy.