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Around the web, November 15



  • Merck responds to Mark Lanier's factually creative Vioxx comments on the Stossel show. I just remember being in the Green Room and repeatedly muttering. "That's not true. That's not true, either."
  • More on the Breusewitz v. Wyeth vaccine case. [Park @ Heritage]
  • Mickey Kaus points out a trial-lawyer-friendly employment-law provision of the California legalized-marijuana referendum that should perhaps have us sighing with relief that it didn't pass. We can end the War on Drugs without killing jobs. [Kaus]
  • Extraordinary prosecutorial abuse in closing statement excused by court; I'm less concerned by the Georgia Supreme Court ruling, given the strategic decision of defense counsel not to object, than I am that a trial-court judge would have permitted the behavior in the first place. [Smith v. State (Ga.) via Volokh]

  • Two "stream-of-commerce" personal jurisdiction merits briefs in U.S. Supreme Court. [Beck]
  • Reform of lame-duck sessions? [Ackerman @ WaPo & Balkinization; Adler @ Volokh]
  • Fred McMurray-lookalike Captain Marvel taken down by a thousand paper-cuts of litigation. [Comic Book Resources (h/t D.F.)]
  • Outrage over TSA virtual-strip-search screenings and abusive retaliatory gropings for opt-outs. [FlyerTalk; Salon; Goldberg; nonviolent resistance; and lots of blogging from Bainbridge]

  • One of those investigations Republicans are threatening of the Obama administration might include one about the firing of Americorps inspector general Gerald Walpin, who complained about a sweetheart deal with an Obama-favored politician accused of wrongdoing. [Wash. Examiner]

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Isaac Gorodetski
Project Manager,
Center for Legal Policy at the
Manhattan Institute
igorodetski@manhattan-institute.org

Katherine Lazarski
Press Officer,
Manhattan Institute
klazarski@manhattan-institute.org

 

Published by the Manhattan Institute

The Manhattan Insitute's Center for Legal Policy.