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Emily Bazelon on personal responsibility



Slate's Emily Bazelon doesn't read the owners' manual for her car, does something the owners' manual explicitly says not to do—recline a seat in a moving car—and hurts herself. Bazelon blames... the automaker and NHTSA for not doing more to warn her, and serves as a mouthpiece for plaintiffs' lawyers who specialize in such arguments, lionizing one who won a $59 million verdict against Toyota for his client's own foolhardiness.

The NHTSA official Bazelon talks to points out that she's taking one safety issue out of context; Bazelon pooh-poohs it because, after all, it happened to her and some other people, too! But Bazelon ignores that there are several dozen other dangerous problems addressed in the owners' manual, many of which would kill or injure far more passengers than reclined drivers' seats. One cannot just look at the idea of putting a single additional sticker on the dashboard: the car would have to be literally wallpapered with additional warnings to cover every warning of a matter at least as hazardous as car-seat reclining, at which point we're back to the problem of owners ignoring warnings. Bazelon simply fails to address this reality.

But, hey, I'll join Bazelon in telling you: don't recline your car seat in a moving vehicle. (Long-time Overlawyered readers already know this from two separate posts.) Also, don't drive with your windows open, your doors unlocked, or your seatbelt unfastened. Reattach your gas cap after filling the tank. Look behind you and ensure the path is clear before going in reverse. Keep your eyes on the road. Don't pass a car in a no-pass zone or drive twice the speed-limit. Sit up straight, especially in a front seat with airbags. Don't have loose heavy objects in the passenger compartment of the car. Don't permit children to play with power windows; don't leave children unattended in a car that is on; don't leave the car on when you're not in it; don't try to jump into a moving vehicle. Don't leave your shoes loose while driving. Be careful when shifting gears. Do not violently swerve an SUV, especially if there are unbelted passengers. Always be aware of the danger of pedal misapplication. Don't fall asleep while driving. Don't drive recklessly, and if you do, don't leave the road. Use your parking brake when you park. Replace a tire after repeatedly patching it; don't drive on bald tires in the rain; and replace your ten-year old tires before you have to drive on a spare. Make sure your floor mat isn't interfering with the pedals. Don't drive into the back of a truck at 60 mph without braking. Et cetera. (cross-posted from Overlawyered)

 

 


Rafael Mangual
Project Manager,
Legal Policy
rmangual@manhattan-institute.org

Katherine Lazarski
Manhattan Institute
klazarski@manhattan-institute.org

 

Published by the Manhattan Institute

The Manhattan Insitute's Center for Legal Policy.