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« Reasons to be Skeptical of Civil Juries: |

April 19, 2007


Pound-the-table department

David Bernstein finds a telling quote from a trial consultant writing in an ABA newsletter:

Jurors, like sporting event spectators, look to pick, and then root, for a side. When jurors have no allegiance to either side, many rely on the story behind the parties to motivate them to commit to a "team." An effective story should incorporate simple arguments that appeal to jurors' common sense. In today's courtrooms, when attorneys simply argue a products liability case using the law or mounds of complicated scientific evidence, they unwisely increase the risk of defeat.

Posted by Ted Frank at 10:03 AM | TrackBack (0)



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The Manhattan Insitute's Center for Legal Policy.