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October 29, 2004


New book on the rule of law

NYU legal historian John Phillip Reid has recently published Rule of Law: The Jurisprudence of Liberty in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries (Northern Illinois U. Press, 2004). From the publisher's blurb:

While the rule of law's English roots can be found in the Middle Ages, its governing doctrine rose to power during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. John Phillip Reid traces the concept's progress through a series of landmark events in Great Britain and North America: the trial of Charles I, the creation of the Mayflower Compact, the demand for a codification of the laws in John Winthrop's Massachusetts Bay Colony, and an attempt to harness the Puritan Lord Protector Oliver Cromwell to the rule of law by crowning him king. The American Revolution, the culmination of two centuries of political foment, marked the greatest victory for rule of law.

(The book has been reviewed for the online "Law & Politics Book Review, here.)

Posted by Michael DeBow at 02:02 PM | TrackBack (0)



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