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FORUM

« Errin' at the podium | Law firm competes on price, cont'd »

September 16, 2004


Next week: Election 2004

Next week, PointOfLaw.com will have an Election 2004 special as its third featured discussion. In this space, we've certainly criticized the Dems for their trial lawyer ties, especially those of former personal injury lawyer John Edwards (see here, here, here, here, and many others). But we're concerned about policies, not politics, and we certainly want to hold the GOP accountable, too (see here).

For next week's discussion, we're excited to host two contributors who are very well-versed in the topic of tort reform but come down on the opposite sides of the political fence. Dr. Ron Chusid, founder of Doctors for Kerry, finds much wanting in our status quo legal system, but argues that the Democratic ticket is more likely than the Republicans to enact meaningful tort reform (in the vein of Nixon-to-China, Clinton-welfare-reform, perhaps?). Our own Ted Frank will make the GOP's case. I expect that we'll actually see a lot of common ground here, so this forum should offer the opportunity to see beneath the political posturing and get some real insights. Bookmark us here, so you can join the discussion next week as it develops!

Posted by James R. Copland at 10:57 AM | TrackBack (1)



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Published by the Manhattan Institute

The Manhattan Insitute's Center for Legal Policy.