class actions, disabled rights, copyright, attorneys general, online speech, law schools, obesity, New York, mortgages, legal blogs, safety, CPSC, pharmaceuticals, patent trolls, ADA filing mills, international human rights, humor, hate speech, illegal drugs, immigration law, cellphones, international law, real estate, bar associations, Environmental Protection Agency, First Amendment, insurance fraud, slip and fall, smoking bans, emergency medicine, regulation and its reform, dramshop statutes, hotels, web accessibility, United Nations, Alien Tort Claims Act, lobbyists, pools, school discipline, Voting Rights Act, legal services programs
 Subscribe Subscribe   Find us on Twitter Follow POL on Twitter  
   
 
   

FORUM

« Jacob Sullum on class actions | Asbestos: send in the prosecutors? »

May 17, 2004


Bad-teacher removal: consensus now complete?

As Joanne Jacobs puts it, remarkable and refreshing: "The New York City teachers' union proposed yesterday cutting to six months the time it takes to remove incompetent teachers, speeding up a process that can now drag on for years.

"As part of a broad overhaul of the disciplinary process and evaluation system for teachers, the union president, Randi Weingarten, also called for ending so-called rubber rooms, where more than 200 teachers facing charges of malfeasance are sent to languish, some for years, while still receiving full pay. She proposed the appointment of a special master and a task force of pro bono lawyers to clear the backlog of cases." (David Herszenhorn, "Failing City Teachers Face a Faster Ax", New York Times, Jan. 15) (more).

[cross-posted from Overlawyered, where it ran Jan. 20, 2004]

Posted by Walter Olson at 11:03 PM | TrackBack (0)



categories:
Employment Law









 

 

Published by the Manhattan Institute

The Manhattan Insitute's Center for Legal Policy.