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May 13, 2004

"Suits on Silica Being Compared to Asbestos Cases"

Plaintiffs' lawyers are trying to turn silica into the next asbestos; though government statistics indicate reduced health problems from the critical industrial sand used to make glass, fiberglass, paints, and ceramics, claims are skyrocketing. Insurers are accusing lawyers of bringing claims of silicosis on behalf of people who have already recovered for alleged asbestosis for the same symptoms. (Jonathan Glater, New York Times, Sep. 5). Using a prominent search engine to find silicosis on the web has a strong chance of leading one to one Texas personal injury law firm or another.

(Cross-posted from Overlawyered, where it ran Sept. 13, 2003)

Posted by Ted Frank at 09:52 PM | TrackBack (0)

Medicine and Law



Published by the Manhattan Institute

The Manhattan Insitute's Center for Legal Policy.